Posts Tagged ‘Review’

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Star Quality Shines Through in Stardust

December 14, 2008

STARDUST (2007)
d. Matthew Vaughn

In the extras, Matthew Vaughn describes this movie as The Princess Bride meets Midnight Run, and it’s an entirely accurate description that captures the delightful and engaging tone of this fantasy based on an original novel from Neil Gaiman.

This Star Is Not The Only Thing Rising

This Star Is Not The Only Thing Rising

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G.I. Joe — Wave 12: Tripwire — Mine Detector

November 23, 2008

Tripwire 1) TRIPWIRE — Mine Detector

  • Head — Lt. Slip Stream (Target Exc. Conquest X-30)
  • Upper Body/Thighs — Sgt. Flash (w5)
  • Shins/Boots — New
  • Weapons/Accessories — New

Tripwire makes his single-carded appearance in Wave 12; he initially was included in the Comic 2-Pack (w5) with Cobra Commander. Unlike a straight repack, Tripwire has been packaged with a MASS element cannister. It is yellow to represent the meteorite element.

This character does a fairly good job of recapturing the likeness of the classic version, though I would have preferred the smooth padding as it was adapted for the H.I.S.S. Driver and AVAC Pilot since that would have been more accurate to the classic figure. But a mere collector’s quibble means nothing as the overall figure is excellent.

 The MASS cannister my figure came with has a removable glass casing, though I’m not sure if this is meant to occur or if it is faulty manufacturing. Therefore I wouldn’t suggest trying to twist off the cannister’s casing. The inclusion of this accessory means that you can complete your MASS device, along with the cannisters that come with the Cobra Diver (w12) and Cobra Commander (w8, w12).

***

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G.I. Joe Comic Pack w6 — Scrap-Iron / Wild Bill (Loose)

November 15, 2008

Just opened up my Scrap-Iron/Wild Bill comic pack, and here are the loose pics for your pleasure.

Wild Bill (Front) 1) Wild Bill Helicopter Pilot

  • Body — Wild Bill (w7)
  • Helmet — New

Here we have Wild Bill painted to represent his cartoon version, which doesn’t really work for me thought I like it a bit better than his drab olive and green colors. He comes with his signature cowboy hat and six-shooters, but he also comes with a cool new removable helmet (which gets a lot of mileage as it will show up with Scarlett (Pilot) and Destro (Pilot) and most likely some Cobra troop builders). Otherwise, since he’s just a straight up repaint, nothing much more to write about. **

Scrap-Iron (Front)2) Scrap-Iron — Anti-Armor Specialist

  • Body — Cobra Trooper (w2)
  • Head — Scrap-Iron (xc2)
  • Vest — New

Utilizing a different body and webgear construction from the Arctic Assault version, this Scrap-Iron looks like the perfect update of the original. And just like the Arctic Assault version, his visor is removable to reveal some pretty ugly scars. However, I think I prefer the Extreme Conditions version over this one mainly because that came first and all my excitement was used over that one, and the re-used comic-pack Firefly mold was rather genius. Here it’s just a ho-hum Cobra Trooper body; it works, but it’s just not as cool! Anyway, still glad to have Scrap-Iron in his classic colors. ***

Meanwhile, a brief glance at the comic reveals artwork that actually looks pretty good! Usually these comics feel light on story and art, so my expectations are low. The story has Wild Bill chasing after Scrap-Iron, and the novelty comes in the form of a narrative told solely through radio transmissions. It’s a pretty interesting gimmick, along the lines of the silent issue, but still a gimmick. It’s pretty much about what one would expect from the comics of these two-packs, but I’m not buying these for the comics.

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G.I. Joe — Wave 12: Cobra Diver — Underwater Trooper

November 12, 2008

As part of the case I ordered online, I received an extra Underwater Trooper, so here I present loose photos of the Cobra Diver.

He is basically a repaint of Lt. Torpedo (w6) with red dominating the color scheme. He has the same accessories as Torpedo with the exception of his sidearm, his rifle — which comes from the Arctic Assault Scrap-Iron (Extreme Conditions Pack #2), and the inclusion of a heavy water element cannister which can be combined with the M.A.S.S. Device.

This figure is a great troop builder even if it is a little underwhelming. Still, in comparison with the other figures in this wave, it tops the Cobra Trooper with red face-mask/sigil. Hopefully, in the near future, I’ll be able to get loose photos of the rest of the figures in this wave.

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Spirals Out of Control: Uzumaki

November 9, 2008

UZUMAKI (2000)
d.  Akiro Higuchi

A strange J-horror movie that approaches Lynchian excess and almost captures Lynchian success, but just falls short. Strong visuals cross-breed with over-the-top characters to create a memorable film that leaves more questions than answers.

Basically, this movie tells the story of small town overcome by a strange obsession with spirals, uzumaki. High schoolers Kirie and her childhood friend, Shuichi, experience the weirdness first hand through Shuichi’s father’s growing obsession with the shape. His obsession ultimately leads to his doom, but not before it infects his wife, Kirie’s father and several classmates.

Ah-hah! ... No I Still Don't Get It

Eyeball, Spiral... Whatever!

As the spiral shape slowly overwhelms the psyche of the townsfolk, we soon discover that it is transforming them as well. Hope arrives in the guise of an out-of-town journalist, who may have discovered a reason behind the strangeness (somehow involving a Japanese play on the word Kagami, meaning both “mirror” and “serpent”). Unfortunately, this never plays out and the town’s fate is sealed.

I describe this film as Lynchian because characters with broader-than-life personalities populate this town as weirdness erupts in violent spasms; the more strange the world becomes, the more strange the people become in reaction. Also, the editing and acting help create a dream-like atmosphere typical of Lynch’s films. However, the tone created by these clashing elements only disrupts and undermines the effectiveness of the horror. Don’t get me wrong, it is still creepy as hell watching this film, but without any rationale, it falls apart. My guess is that this is based on a manga.

Still, it is worth it to see the human snails climbing the walls of the school building, even if it is only brief.

** stars.

Next week, I hope to have the live-action Aeon Flux as well as a couple of Masters of Horror episodes.

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This Movie Stinks… Of Beauty: Street Trash

November 2, 2008

STREET TRASH (1987)
d. Jim Muro

You gotta love those trashy independent horror films from the 80s — The Toxic Avenger, Re-Animator, and Street Trash (among many more). Films such as these pushed the envelope of taste and humour as they stretched the boundaries of what was allowable on-screen — insane gore effects despite the low budgets, and, more often than not, full frontal nekkid chicks (and a couple of penis shots for fair balance).

You Know It's the 80s When It's Neon-Colored

You Know It’s the 80s When It’s Neon-Colored

This cult movie, long consigned to the back wall of video stores, finally made its DVD debut a couple of years back in a souped up two-disc “meltdown” edition released by Synapse Films. It tells the story of a community of bums living out of a automobile wrecking yard in Flatbush, Brooklyn, and what happens when a 60 year-old hooch, Viper, hits that community and starts melting bums from the inside out.

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“It’s All A Set-Up” — Halloween: Resurrection

October 18, 2008

HALLOWEEN: RESURRECTION (2001)
d. Rick Rosenthal 

In spite of bringing back director Rick Rosenthal (Halloween II), and in spite of a fairly plausible explanation for bringing back Michael Myers, this film totally squanders the energy and freshness from the H2O reboot and settles for a mediocre meta-commentary on horror films (more successfully explored in Scream) and reality television/media that feels several years too late to be relevant.

The film begins with Laurie Strode in lock-down at a psych ward; she pretends to be medicated (stashing the pills in a doll) while waiting for the inevitable arrival of her brother. It is revealed that Michael switched places with a paramedic, and that the paramedic was the one who Laurie decapitated in the last film. So when Michael arrives, it becomes immediately apparent that the quality of script is not on the same level as the previous film; for one thing, characters do stupid things, they die.

For example, after hearing his partner getting killed, a security guard investigates and comes across a laundry dryer, and in a gag reminiscent of the scene in Part 6, decides for no reason to open it to check its contents. Nothing motivated this action beyond sheer plot contrivance for a boring kill; even the manner in which Michael appears (lowering himself one-handed from the ceiling) steals from a previous film.

The opening sequence climaxes with a confrontation between Laurie and Michael on the roof of the sanitarium. Having successfully ensnared him, Laurie does the unforgivable act of trying to unmask The Shape; of course this leads to her downfall and one very angry fan. What an insulting way to end her character’s journey, especially after how strong she was at the end of the last film.

Once Laurie Strode is killed off, I wondered “How the hell are they going to motivate Michael now?” Well, apparently the plot proper kicks off with a group of college kids taking part in a webcast set in the Myers household. What attempts to be a meta-commentary on the horror film genre as a whole, the Halloween films in particular, media manipulation in general, film voyeurism, and the sex vs. violence debate only comes off as a snarky, half-thought out dull film that just happens to have Michael Myers in it.

The group of kids are hardly engaging or as sympathetic as the group from H2O, as it includes that unfunny dude from American Pie and Katee Sackhoff (Battlestar Galactica) doing her facial tic schtick.

So it’s ho-hum as Michael winnows down the group of kids while they cry for help directly addressing the camera Blair Witch-style. The only highlight: Busta Rhymes in a Michael Myers mask cussing out the actual Michael Myers. It is also the lowlight of the entire series (Thorn cult notwithstanding).

One star.

Well, this wraps up the Halloween franchise marathon; too bad it ends on a downer. Next up, the psychic thriller, Patrick.

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Alive And Kicking: Halloween 20 Years Later

October 18, 2008

HALLOWEEN: 20 YEARS LATER (H2O) (1998)
d. Steve Miner 

Now we’re talking! After the dismal and misguided part 6 comes this invigorating jolt to the franchise. A large credit goes to the fantastic script and the great ensemble cast.

Oh Shit!

Oh, Crap!

This movie gingerly skips over the events of Parts 3-6, while not entirely retconning them, and picks up plot threads from Part 2. A fairly wise move that allows the film to feel like it’s starting fresh because it dumps the Thorn cult subplot and goes back to its roots (far more successfully than Part 4 had been touted).

Picking up 20 years from the original events, the film reintroduces Laurie Strode who has been relocated by the WPA to Glenwood, CA under the new name, Keri Tate. She teaches at the posh Hillcrest Academy where her son, John (Josh Hartnett in his first major role) also attends. She is still haunted by visions of her brother, Michael, and it is causing tension between her and her son.

The great thing about giving her a son, other than to raise the stakes of what she has to lose, is that we get a relationship that allows her to be human and sympathetic. She has been medicating herself to suppress her memories of that haunting and fateful night, but, in classic horror movie return-of-the-repressed  type fashion, Michael comes back.

He first starts in Langdon, Illinois where he pays a visit to the assistant nurse of Dr. Loomis (Nancy Stephen reprising her role!) and discovers the new identity of his sister. And this initial scene telegraphs how smart and fresh the script will serve up the rest of the scares and thrills; it learned from the Kevin Williamson school of horror screenwriting.

On a side note, Michael looks a lot leaner in this film; he definitely lost the bulk he gained from film to film and it makes him scary fast; like a wiry starved rat. And it seems they cast Chris Durand mainly for his eyes; he does a great job of exuding childlike innocence with pure evil — like a kid intrigued by pulling the wings off flies.

In any case, Michael makes his way towards the academy, which, on the weekend of Halloween, is emptied of practically all the staff and student body (who have gone on a trip to Yosemite) except for a few who remain behind to party it up. This group includes Laurie’s son, his girlfriend (a young Michelle Williams) and another couple. During the time he is traveling, like a fateful bullet on its way to its target, the movie allows us to get to know the characters a little.

And when Michael strikes, as he does, these kids are allowed to fight back and even express how scared shitless they are. Just these actions alone are pretty revolutionary for a slasher film. They truly become our stand-ins because they smartly challenge our suspension of disbelief. What I mean to say is, whenever we watch these kinds of films, we hate it when the characters are stupid and do stupid things. In this movie, they are allowed to do smart things, like fight back. They’re still outmatched by the unkillable Michael, but the very effort allows us to root for them and makes it even more painful when the characters we like end up dying.

For example, when Laurie has a chance to flee with her son and girlfriend she decides to stay and confront Michael. Now this may seem like a stupid thing, but it’s set up in such a way that her action becomes noble and heroic. It’s a kick-ass moment for the character, because up until this point in her life (even reaching back into Parts 1 and 2), she never fought back or really stood up for herself; she was always running away. Here she takes charge, and it is empowering.

Even John Carpenter’s original score benefits from the reboot; it is scored with lush and moody strings and doesn’t fully reveal itself in its original sparse piano melody until after the final scene plays out.

And the final scene is incredible. It is the best death scene in any Halloween picture that made me cheer out loud for the victor. You have to see it.

So, because of a smart script, and a great cast (including Adam Arkin and LL Cool J in great supporting roles) the Halloween franchise finally gets a sequel fairly worthy, and in some instances, even better than the original source movie. Three and a half stars, hands down.

Next up, we’ll see how they squander all this good will in Halloween: Resurrection.

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Get A Hobby, Michael!

October 16, 2008

HALLOWEEN 5: THE REVENGE OF MICHAEL MYERS (1989)
d. Dominique Othenin-Girard

As earnest and as surprising as Halloween 4 struck me, this film feels flabby and not as fresh. Coming out within a year of the last one, it settles for typical slasher movie tropes despite an effort to maintain continuity within the Haddonfield-verse and despite an anemic attempt to inject new interest in the franchise.

Picking up where the last film ended, this movie has eerie parallels to the structure of Halloween II. We follow the fate of Michael after he falls down the well, to discover his near escape and recovery in a nearby river-shack. Only after establishing that Michael is still alive do we jump forward a year to revisit Jamie, suffering nightmares and voiceless in a children’s clinic.

For much of the movie, Dr. Loomis spends his time brow-beating Jamie into giving him info on Michael’s whereabouts, but for some inexplicable reason (besides having lost her ability to speak) she won’t help him except when her immediate friends are in danger. While Rachel from the last movie is offed in the first act, she is replaced by a friend, Tina — perhaps the only bit of good casting in this film.

So, as we lumber like the Shape from set piece to set piece, the kills not feeling particularly inventive or scary (or even gory) the movie feels mired in mud. Even the final confrontation between Dr. Loomis and Michael lacks any real thrill or tension — a heavy chain net? Really? And sedative darts? What?!

This film also has the dubious honor of introducing the mysterious “Man In Black” who wears a tattoo seen briefly in Michael Myer’s house (which, by the way, looks nothing like the original house from the first film), and leaves more question marks hopefully to be answered in the next installment.

So 1 1/2 stars just for the able and engaging performance of Wendy Kaplan as Tina, and for the script paying attention to continuity. Otherwise not a very memorable entry in the Halloween franchise.

Next up, we hack our way into Halloween 6: The Curse of Michael Myers, featuring an early performance by Paul Rudd.

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“We Are Talking About Evil On Two Legs!”

October 15, 2008

HALLOWEEN 4: THE RETURN OF MICHAEL MYERS (1988)
d. Dwight H. Little

Hoo boy, and does he! A little pudgier than previously, but he’s back! And so is Dr. Loomis (Donald Pleasance) spouting warnings about “evil on two legs” to anyone who’ll listen — and surprisingly, people do.

Halloween 4 tells the story of Michael’s return to Haddonfield, 10 years to the day of his original killing spree; apparently he and Dr. Loomis both survived the explosion of the oxygen tanks, and while Michael went into a coma, Dr. Loomis suffered severe burns on the right side of his body.

Here We Go Again!

Here We Go Again!

During a transfer from a federal psych ward back to Smith’s Grove ward, Michael escapes to seek a young girl named Jamie (nice!) who is the daughter of Laurie Strode. It’s not explicitly stated what happened to Laurie, but it is implied that she died some 11 months earlier. Jamie is now in the foster care of the Carruthers.

In revisiting this franchise, I was surprised at the effective mood and some fair scares; this is mainly brought on by some solid acting, Donald Pleasance’s spouting notwithstanding (though it’s not as histrionic as I expected), and very effective lighting. It does a good job of establishing many new characters while keeping in mind its roots (mentions of Chief Brackett, Jamie’s photo of Laurie, Jamie dressing in a clown suit for trick or treat).

Perhaps what surprised me the most, other than how seriously this movie was taking itself, was the script; it is at times engaging in setting up the thrills, but most of all, it actually respects its characters.

For example, when Dr. Loomis shows up ranting that Michael has returned, Sheriff Meeker actually trusts and believes him! Sure, he expresses some doubt, but a quick look at the decimated police station is enough to spur him to action. This makes Michael’s threat all that more believable because these guys are scared and act sensibly — they hole up at Meeker’s house and prepare to barricade themselves, unaware, of course, that Michael is already there.

Another moment in the script that floored me was after Rachel and Jamie elude Michael at the school, they bump into a vigilante group. After catching them up to speed, their response is to get the hell out of there. Good for them! No, “let’s split up and catch him” bullshit, just get in the truck and go!

Of course, these logical reactions by these people only lead to my main complaint about the movie: Michael Myers is fucking everywhere! He’s in the tea pot for crying out loud! (not really) But apparently he is faster than cars and able to read minds. So when the local gun group is like, letsgeddafugouttahere, guess who hitches a ride on the back of the pick up. Yup. Michael. When Dr. Loomis and Jamie, well ahead of Michael, get to the school, guess who they bump into in the hallways. Yup. Michael. Yeahbuhwha–!

The last leap in logic, which soured the movie for me is the final ’“twist” ending which comes out of left field, even if you were to factor in trauma spurring on the character’s actions. It doesn’t make sense.

So not the total turkey I half-remembered, but not any better than Halloween II and not even as good as Halloween 3. Therefore, two stars.

Next, we keep rolling with the Halloween sequels — Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers.